Archive for the 'Quail Habitat Management' Category

By Jim Evans November 3, 2009 GREAT HUNTING RETREAT This 980 acres will make a great hunting area. Over 400 acres of mature pines, the rest in younger trees. Abundant deer, quail, and turkey! Are you scanning the classified ads and touring the countryside, in search of a piece of property to manage for quail? […]

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Managing Quail Fields is the latest DVD release from Quality Wildlife.

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Over the years I have had the opportunity to work with many landowners that were devoted to having quail on their property. Questions about feeding quail seem to always arise at some point during my visit. For this reason I thought I would take a few minutes to share some thoughts with you on the […]

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Many years ago, as a student, I remember listening to one of my wildlife professors lecturing our class about some of the animals he had worked with in the arid regions of Africa. He showed us a picture of an Oryx antelope. This critter has long sharp horns, weighs about 400 pounds and looks as […]

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Many of you managing your land for quail are also planting deer food plots on the same tract. I see this as a common practice as I consult with various landowners. Many times what I also observe is a wasted opportunity to improve quail habitat. Let me explain.

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It has been stated that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. The same could be said about chicken litter. Although this material has been recycled through a chicken, I have found it to be very beneficial as fertilizer on quail land, food plots, and dove fields. Now before you go turning up your nose […]

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There is a saying that goes ” all that is complex is not useful but all that is useful is simple”. Whenever I visit a property to give advice concerning quail management, I try to keep it as simple as possible. The simpler you make things, the more likely it is that people will be […]

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They are out there! In your fields, day and night, these enemies are slowly but surely are eating away at the fabric of your hard fought efforts to have quail this fall and winter. No, I am not talking about predators; I am referring to sod-grasses and hardwood brush.

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We are all familiar with the motel sign that reads, “Please Do Not Disturb.”This is definitely one sign you don’t want hanging on your quail hunting fields. If performed correctly, disturbing the soil during the winter months can improve this winter’s hunting and also be an inexpensive method to keep your fields productive for the […]

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General land management practices of the past thirty-five to forty years have favored some species of wildlife, but quail is not one of them. For this reason most of us have to apply planning and effort to produce strong quail hunting land.

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